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Hibidi-Shibidi
2011-04-10, 12:36 PM
The main water line coming in the house runs from one corner of the basement to the other. With the erratic temperature changes, the pipe has been sweating pretty heavily.

Is there something to wrap it in that will keep it from building up so much moisture?

Short of putting a dehumidifier down there, will that pipe insulation that's made to prevent freezing be a viable alternative?

http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/300/c6/c6d970d9-537a-4b0a-abc1-3edaccebcbf2_300.jpg

Thats the stuff Im thinking about.

JDLM
2011-04-10, 12:38 PM
Coat walls and floors with a waterproofing compound... Choose your product with care. There are various types of waterproofing products on the market, so it is critical that you choose one that is a waterproofer, not a sealer! A sealer protects the concrete from surface moisture, but does not stop the movement of moisture through the concrete from the outside as effectively as a true waterproofer. Also, be sure the product you choose is designed to be used below grade, and will seal walls under water pressure.
Proper preparation of the concrete is essential. If there is old paint or other coatings on the wall, they should be removed either chemically or by sandblasting if you want the best possible job. Not to say unequivocally that the new coating won't stick... it just may not do as good a job sealing the wall. Remember, there is no such thing as perfection... it is the striving for perfection that defines us and our work!
Wrap all cold water pipes and tanks... http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/i/pipewrap.jpg This is the easiest and most direct solution to prevent condensation on cold surfaces... don't let the moist air reach them! Do not use fiberglass pipe wrap... it is not waterproof, will absorb water, and the extra step of wrapping the fiberglass with a plastic vapor barrier is more than a pain.. it is downright frustrating! Use plastic foam pipe wrap instead. It is available in various lengths (depending on where you buy it), and is easily cut with scissors or a utility knife. Miter (angle cut) all corners so they meet as closely as possible, and then wrap all seams with duct tape. You might say... "Yeah, but there are fifty miles of pipe to wrap! Do I have to wrap it all?" Answer... not really. The amount of condensation is proportional to the amount of exposed pipe. The less pipe you have exposed to the moisture, the less total condensation you will have. Pipes that run above suspended ceilings, for example, will often not collect condensation because the area is drier than the basement itself. In other words, cover as much pipe as you can without sacrificing your sanity or the economic security of your family!
Well pressure tanks are also the source of mucho condensation. The ideal wrap for them is a plastic foam water heater blanket. However, if you cannot find or order one from your local home, plumbing, or hardware store, using fiberglass and then tightly wrapping it in a heavy plastic tarp (and duct tape, of course) is an acceptable, albeit second choice alternative. One thing about these tanks is that the condensation tends to limit itself to the water level, so even a half wrap can be beneficial in a pinch.
Use a dehumidifier... Even if you do all the things mentioned above, you will not eliminate all the moisture from the basement air. Human and animal traffic leaves moisture behind. If you have a finished basement with potted plants and little ventilation, more moisture is added to the air. Open the window and bingo... in comes the outside humidity! So just about any basement can benefit from the use of a dehumidifier.

The Lox
2011-04-10, 10:03 PM
The main water line coming in the house runs from one corner of the basement to the other. With the erratic temperature changes, the pipe has been sweating pretty heavily.

Is there something to wrap it in that will keep it from building up so much moisture?

Short of putting a dehumidifier down there, will that pipe insulation that's made to prevent freezing be a viable alternative?

http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/300/c6/c6d970d9-537a-4b0a-abc1-3edaccebcbf2_300.jpg

Thats the stuff Im thinking about.

Is there not a vent that comes off of the main HVAC duct out that you can open/close? It sounds like the area is not temperature regulated well enough. I would have to assume that the pipe insulation you show there would work..

KCMAXX
2011-04-12, 08:44 PM
Pool noodles are cheap at Toys R Us, cheaper than this shit at HD.

They may have the pink that matches your curtains too... :mrgreen:

Corners
2011-04-13, 02:33 AM
Yep. Just insulate with anti-sweat insulation.

Also, I'd run a dehumidifier if I were you. I have one running always (when the humidistat turns it on) that has a hose over to the floor drain by the HVAC unit. No problems.